I’ve Been Sucked Into Pokemon Go

2016-07-16 04.21.33In retrospect it’s not surprising that I’ve been sucked into a video game, because that happens all the time. But this one is something special. Not just because of what I take from it, but because of what I’ve seen it do to and for the people around me. It was also inevitable. As a long-time Pokemon player (it was my very first game for my very first handheld console), the dream to catch Pokemon in real life was always there, and now we have this — far, far sooner than I ever expected.

I’ve had it for about a week now, and I love it for a number of reasons. On the surface it’s pretty simple, and it’s a lot like Ingress, which I also enjoyed. But last night I went downtown where a bunch of people decided to get together and throw a Pokemon Go event. By “a bunch,” of course, I mean “about five thousand at least.” Every parking structure in the area was full, and there were so many people it was hard to get around. Bands were playing, people were handing out badges and water bottles, grouping up to help each other find Pokemon, etc. And everyone was so friendly. My friends and I met up with a couple hunting a Bulbasaur and we walked together for hours. And there were so many PokeStops I almost couldn’t get to them all before the first ones were refreshing again. Not to mention everyone had a lure. Continue reading “I’ve Been Sucked Into Pokemon Go”

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Escape In An Hour, Or You Die

Yay, we died! Time to celebrate anyway.

Tonight I tried my first escape room. Myself and eight others were kidnapped, and then we woke up in a room where a girl on a TV said that we had one hour to figure out how to escape or the poison in our watches would kill us all. This particular escape room was in Los Angeles, and though they apparently do multiple kinds, this one was based off a game series I hadn’t heard of called Zero Escape, though now I kind of need to look it up.

I only just recently found out about the escape room thing. I’ve known about the games for ages; start in a room, click on everything, find keys, solve puzzles, figure out how to progress, that sort of thing. It turns out you can do it in real life, too, and I thought that was the coolest idea ever. It took nine of us, which was a lot more than I thought, but it was done really well. Continue reading “Escape In An Hour, Or You Die”

Hello, I’m Still Writing

If you judge my productivity based on how often I update my blog, and by its content, you might think I gave up writing long ago for no real reason. And while that’s not quite true, I have been dealing with a long list of setbacks combined with a general lack of time for writing. That’s one thing that being a full-time student will do to you. I’d love to be productive on the writing front, but I’m currently learning two years of math that I will never use again in my life. But my bitter ramblings on general education would result in a blog post so long that people would rightfully point out that word count could just have gone in a book instead.

But I’ve still been making progress on the creative front all the same. Unfortunately, for anyone interested in the progress of the Dream Sanctum trilogy, that seems to be on an indefinite hiatus. All three books are written to completion, but cover art and editing are another story. I hope to figure those out in the near future, but for now I’ve decided to focus on things that are more under my control. Continue reading “Hello, I’m Still Writing”

Let Me Die Already

I recently asked some friends and followers what they thought about the concept of physician-assisted suicide when it came to the terminally ill and those suffering from incurable, severe pain. Most of the results were in favor of it, which reflects the growing support across the United States.

But when I asked whether it should also be the case for certain instances of mental illness, like depression, the answers changed a little. Suddenly people weren’t so sure. There were too many grey areas and things to consider. It’s harder to diagnose these invisible illnesses than it is something like cancer. Some rightly pointed out that in many instances, suicidal tendencies are fleeting and often regretted later. At least one other pointed out that depression doesn’t cause actual pain, so it was unclear if mental suffering alone was enough to justify such a thing. There’s also the question of whether mental illness in itself disqualifies someone from being mentally sound enough to make a decision that involves ending their own life. Continue reading “Let Me Die Already”

Do We Have To Be Afraid Of “Coddling Culture”?

To hear some say it, society has gone soft. People are too offended by too many things, there are content and trigger warnings on everything and there’s a growing movement telling people with all sorts of mental illnesses that they aren’t at fault for anything and don’t have to take responsibility for their actions. People are afraid of everything, but they want society as a whole to change so they don’t have to change themselves. If you listen to these arguments long enough you might start feeling afraid for the future of our country (but don’t admit to that fear publicly, you wuss).

I’ve long held that if you really want to find the most offended people in society, look no further than those who can’t seem to stop complaining that people are too offended by everything. No matter who complains about what, they’ll be there to get angry about how everyone else should be like them and not get so angry about things. Don’t think about it too hard. Continue reading “Do We Have To Be Afraid Of “Coddling Culture”?”

Why Watch People Play Video Games?

Jimmy Kimmel doesn’t understand why anyone who likes video games would voluntarily choose to watch other people play video games. He likened the phenomenon to “going to a restaurant and having someone eat your food for you.” Not quite accurate, but it’s a late night talk show. Comedy (and thus, exaggeration), not accuracy, is the goal.

But then, it’s not like his sentiments are uncommon. Video games becoming socially accepted at all is still a recent thing. It used to be you could be called a nerd (because that was bad back then) and made fun of for liking games, and that was from people in our own age group. Older generations would probably have a harder time understanding it, much like it’s hard for them to understand “the Google” or the concept of using a computer without getting infected with spyware every other week because you keep using Internet Explorer even though I totally put Chrome on there just yesterday and told you where to find it and you keep uninstalling the security software I put on there to keep you safe for god knows what reason can you just please just not have a technological disaster for a whole month oh my god. Continue reading “Why Watch People Play Video Games?”

The Compelling Story of How I Chose My Major

With school starting in a little under two weeks, it’s worth noting that I only just decided what I want my major to be a week or two ago. When I first started thinking about the idea of going back to school, I was torn. I originally went as an English major, and I liked it well enough (or so I thought), but I also really like communication studies. I’d love to take my emphasis in argumentation and persuasion. I also thought about double majoring, but I haven’t gotten there quite yet.

Continue reading “The Compelling Story of How I Chose My Major”